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Fact and Science have NO place in Car Audio!


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This is going to be awesome and educational. I'm using a RF 10 farad cap,XS D3400 and D1200 with 2 + runs/2 - runs (1 is straight to frame in front) and a 3rd that bolts through truck body then to frame in the back.. Think I'll take the ground off my front battery and make it a + run instead..

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this make head hurt

:domodance: :domodance: :domodance: :domodance: :domodance: :domodance: :domodance: :domodance: :domodance: :domodance:

wouldn't u have more surface charge with more batteries. batteries have surface charge, so more batts = more surface charge??????

or do caps have more surface charge then batts

am i retarded?????

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SD, thank for the input. I would have replied earlier, but I was measuring the output of my amp with a yardstick . . .

:rofl:

LOL someone's got jokes.

While we are on the subject... Since clamping is only "ballpark" at best and complete hogwash at worst, is it still a reliable method of measuring a reactive load?

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Awesome thread here!

But something I haven't seen brought up yet is cars without frames.
I'm still curious about high powered setups in uni-body vehicles, and using their chassis as ground?

I know it was good for a 1500w setup, but what about a 10K setup?


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was also wondering^^

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Awesome thread here!

But something I haven't seen brought up yet is cars without frames.

I'm still curious about high powered setups in uni-body vehicles, and using their chassis as ground?

I know it was good for a 1500w setup, but what about a 10K setup?

That's what I have. Amp grounded to rear strut tower. Alt grounded to front strut tower. Front batt grounded to strut tower too lol

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Awesome thread here!

But something I haven't seen brought up yet is cars without frames.

I'm still curious about high powered setups in uni-body vehicles, and using their chassis as ground?

I know it was good for a 1500w setup, but what about a 10K setup?

Think of it like this... What if you were able to gut your car of everything that's not steel and then roll it into a sphere the length of the positive battery cable that goes to your amp/cap/battery bank.

That's would be the gauge of negative wire you have by using the frame and body. And, unibody cars have an integrated frame. It doesn't look like the frame of a frame and body vehicle but there are structural frame rails built into the body of the car. So essentially, with a unibodied car and negative connections at the thickest locations, you are connected to both the frame and the body. To be sure, there is less steel in a Honda Civic than there is in a full sized truck with a thick frame but in the end, it's not a big enough difference to affect the current carrying capabilities in an amplifier power circuit(s).

On another note..... I was glad to see the clamp demonstration. It's been twenty five years since I studied electronics in college and I never used AC theory much at all over the years so even though I knew something wasn't right with that clamp theory, I couldn't point it out.

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SD, thank for the input. I would have replied earlier, but I was measuring the output of my amp with a yardstick . . .

:rofl:

LOL someone's got jokes.

While we are on the subject... Since clamping is only "ballpark" at best and complete hogwash at worst, is it still a reliable method of measuring a reactive load?

:) Clamping is suitable for measuring the performance of DC circuits.

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Awesome thread here!

But something I haven't seen brought up yet is cars without frames.

I'm still curious about high powered setups in uni-body vehicles, and using their chassis as ground?

I know it was good for a 1500w setup, but what about a 10K setup?

Think of it like this... What if you were able to gut your car of everything that's not steel and then roll it into a sphere the length of the positive battery cable that goes to your amp/cap/battery bank.

That's would be the gauge of negative wire you have by using the frame and body. And, unibody cars have an integrated frame. It doesn't look like the frame of a frame and body vehicle but there are structural frame rails built into the body of the car. So essentially, with a unibodied car and negative connections at the thickest locations, you are connected to both the frame and the body. To be sure, there is less steel in a Honda Civic than there is in a full sized truck with a thick frame but in the end, it's not a big enough difference to affect the current carrying capabilities in an amplifier power circuit(s).

On another note..... I was glad to see the clamp demonstration. It's been twenty five years since I studied electronics in college and I never used AC theory much at all over the years so even though I knew something wasn't right with that clamp theory, I couldn't point it out.

Okay, I fully understand everything you just said. Actually, I am the son of a 40 year master electrician, so I may not be a genius , but I am fluent with how electric works, both ac and dc.

But my point is, some uni-body vehicles are glued together, literally! I have watched them be built on how it's made. So, in these cases, you cant really consider it a continuous piece of metal, like you were refering to. I'm just wondering how much the "glue", (or panel bond to be specific), effects the current flow? In particular, on larger systems, of 10K or more?


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Well, I'm not aware of any electrically conductive epoxies, so obviously, I would say they affect it dramatically. That said, I don't know that there are any manufacturers using epoxies to fasten structural frame sections to the main body section in entirety. There are a lot more than in the past but again, we're still dealing with a lof of welds and a lot of steel, as opposed to a length of cable.

But when that does indeed become a problem, I have no doubt that the car audio industry will find out before any other, given the large currents we send through a car's body and frame.

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