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2 minutes ago, Sumtingwong said:

The battery i put in it was a rayvac i think but it will always show 7volts ill change my rcas to more expensive ones i bought cause im using some cheap schoses right now. But i wanna supply the power the sub needs so i kinda wanna go overkill on a nice amp cause the skar will never give it all it can cause ohm rise. Should i get like a taramps 8k or something i dunno. And yeah i think the clipping was from the amp being pushed to hard i feel. Should i also ground my rcas while im back there or is that stupid 

Also feel lile the sub is getting close to maxing out cause it moves alot then the meter is only reading like 400 watts so im probrably just stupid is a 30mm xmax sub moves alot more than i think 

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20 minutes ago, Sumtingwong said:

The battery i put in it was a rayvac i think but it will always show 7volts ill change my rcas to more expensive ones i bought cause im using some cheap schoses right now. But i wanna supply the power the sub needs so i kinda wanna go overkill on a nice amp cause the skar will never give it all it can cause ohm rise. Should i get like a taramps 8k or something i dunno. And yeah i think the clipping was from the amp being pushed to hard i feel. Should i also ground my rcas while im back there or is that stupid 

Well, I don't know what battery you're using, but with the car on, it should read 14.7v and with the car off, it should read around 12.3ish. 

If you want to give the sub more power, first I would make sure your electrical can keep up. If you're really that worried about impedance rise on the sub, then I would suggest a DC 3.5k or a Cresendo 3k, or an Incriminator Audio IA20.1. If you're trying to stay cheap, the Sundown SFB3000.1 would be my recommendation. Though I know people who swear by Taramps. That's just my opinion. But MAKE SURE YOUR ELECTRICAL IS SOLID or you spent all that money for nothing. 

When feeding a sub "over rated power", you might want to have an enclosure designed specifically for that sub and that amount of power. It goes a long way, trust me. It all matters huge! To the sound and the longevity of the equipment. 

The more power you send the sub, the more critical it is to set your gains and crossovers correctly. If you're serious, spend the extra dough and get yourself a DD1 and CC1. I own both and love them! The more power you send the sub, the more likely the sub is to reach its mechanical limits. It will have more trouble getting rid of the extra heat, and eventually will fail. Also, an in dash volt meter is a huge plus as well. 

That's my opinion on all that anyway

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3 hours ago, Dafaseles said:

Well, I don't know what battery you're using, but with the car on, it should read 14.7v and with the car off, it should read around 12.3ish. 

If you want to give the sub more power, first I would make sure your electrical can keep up. If you're really that worried about impedance rise on the sub, then I would suggest a DC 3.5k or a Cresendo 3k, or an Incriminator Audio IA20.1. If you're trying to stay cheap, the Sundown SFB3000.1 would be my recommendation. Though I know people who swear by Taramps. That's just my opinion. But MAKE SURE YOUR ELECTRICAL IS SOLID or you spent all that money for nothing. 

When feeding a sub "over rated power", you might want to have an enclosure designed specifically for that sub and that amount of power. It goes a long way, trust me. It all matters huge! To the sound and the longevity of the equipment. 

The more power you send the sub, the more critical it is to set your gains and crossovers correctly. If you're serious, spend the extra dough and get yourself a DD1 and CC1. I own both and love them! The more power you send the sub, the more likely the sub is to reach its mechanical limits. It will have more trouble getting rid of the extra heat, and eventually will fail. Also, an in dash volt meter is a huge plus as well. 

That's my opinion on all that anyway

I think he's talking about the battery in the AMM-1.  Try replacing the AMM-1 battery with a new Energizer or Duracell and see if that changes anything.

 

Also, if you have a multi-meter, test the impedance of the subwoofer when it's not hooked up to the amplifier.  Resting, it should be close to 1Ω.  The driver impedance changes as the driver moves, typically rising (it's normal to see it rise and fall while playing music)

 

Make sure you have your subsonic/infrasonic filter set to just below the tuning frequency of the box.  If the box is trying to play lower than the tuning frequency you run the risk of the sub "unloading" or bottoming out.  Basically, it's trying to move more than the Xmax and launch the cone on the  up motion while bottoming out/crashing on the down motion.

 

If you had the amp gain set too high and the amp was clipping, it's possible the sub is damaged (which I think Dafaseles mentioned in a previous reply)  When an amp clips it outputs a signal closer to a square wave than a sine wave and speakers can't play square waves.  Even at relatively low power (compared to the RMS rating of a sub), a clipped signal can damage the voice coil.

 

Hopefully tour sub isn't damaged.

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8 hours ago, Arthur79 said:

I think he's talking about the battery in the AMM-1.  Try replacing the AMM-1 battery with a new Energizer or Duracell and see if that changes anything.

 

Also, if you have a multi-meter, test the impedance of the subwoofer when it's not hooked up to the amplifier.  Resting, it should be close to 1Ω.  The driver impedance changes as the driver moves, typically rising (it's normal to see it rise and fall while playing music)

 

Make sure you have your subsonic/infrasonic filter set to just below the tuning frequency of the box.  If the box is trying to play lower than the tuning frequency you run the risk of the sub "unloading" or bottoming out.  Basically, it's trying to move more than the Xmax and launch the cone on the  up motion while bottoming out/crashing on the down motion.

 

If you had the amp gain set too high and the amp was clipping, it's possible the sub is damaged (which I think Dafaseles mentioned in a previous reply)  When an amp clips it outputs a signal closer to a square wave than a sine wave and speakers can't play square waves.  Even at relatively low power (compared to the RMS rating of a sub), a clipped signal can damage the voice coil.

 

Hopefully tour sub isn't damaged.

I didn't even realize he was referring to the 9v in the AMM-1 🤣 oops.

And yeah, that's everything I've been saying, just explained a lot better. 

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2011 Chevy Silverado under construction

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16 hours ago, Dafaseles said:

Well, I don't know what battery you're using, but with the car on, it should read 14.7v and with the car off, it should read around 12.3ish. 

If you want to give the sub more power, first I would make sure your electrical can keep up. If you're really that worried about impedance rise on the sub, then I would suggest a DC 3.5k or a Cresendo 3k, or an Incriminator Audio IA20.1. If you're trying to stay cheap, the Sundown SFB3000.1 would be my recommendation. Though I know people who swear by Taramps. That's just my opinion. But MAKE SURE YOUR ELECTRICAL IS SOLID or you spent all that money for nothing. 

When feeding a sub "over rated power", you might want to have an enclosure designed specifically for that sub and that amount of power. It goes a long way, trust me. It all matters huge! To the sound and the longevity of the equipment. 

The more power you send the sub, the more critical it is to set your gains and crossovers correctly. If you're serious, spend the extra dough and get yourself a DD1 and CC1. I own both and love them! The more power you send the sub, the more likely the sub is to reach its mechanical limits. It will have more trouble getting rid of the extra heat, and eventually will fail. Also, an in dash volt meter is a huge plus as well. 

That's my opinion on all that anyway

Ill be sure to check those out i meant 7vs on the amm1 but for my alt i have a 120amp rn regular battery but i have a 1100cca capacitor thats 375 farad i think so voltage drop isnt to bad im thinking about putting a big tractor battery in for my main battery

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17 minutes ago, Sumtingwong said:

Ill be sure to check those out i meant 7vs on the amm1 but for my alt i have a 120amp rn regular battery but i have a 1100cca capacitor thats 375 farad i think so voltage drop isnt to bad im thinking about putting a big tractor battery in for my main battery

Well, once you start getting into the 4k-5k watt and up ranges, you start stepping into the high output alternator range and multiple batteries. It takes power to make power. 

As for the batteries you choose to run, cold cranking amps (CCA) doesn't have anything to do with car audio unfortunately. All that is is a measurement used by battery companies to measure how long you can crank over a battery at something like -40 degrees F and all the cells will stay even and above 9v or something like that. In car audio, we need amp hours (AH). The more the better. Lithium is a bit different, where because of the discharge and recharge rate, you wouldn't need as big of an alternator, or as many AH. And as a side note, you shouldn't mix battery chemistries. Capacitors are kind of obsolete now a days with the introduction of lithium banks, but to even get a cap bank worth a crap you'd have to get somewhere in the area of a 5000 f super cap bank. (I don't know much about those. @Fish Chriswould be the dude to talk to about that). But that's why an in dash volt meter is so important, so you can monitor your voltage and address any issues before it starts damaging equipment. Even a cheap one is better than nothing. 

Yeah, I don't know why I thought you meant 7v on your car battery🤣 sorry, I wasn't thinking

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2011 Chevy Silverado under construction

My build log here. Check it out! 

 

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2 hours ago, Dafaseles said:

Well, once you start getting into the 4k-5k watt and up ranges, you start stepping into the high output alternator range and multiple batteries. It takes power to make power. 

As for the batteries you choose to run, cold cranking amps (CCA) doesn't have anything to do with car audio unfortunately. All that is is a measurement used by battery companies to measure how long you can crank over a battery at something like -40 degrees F and all the cells will stay even and above 9v or something like that. In car audio, we need amp hours (AH). The more the better. Lithium is a bit different, where because of the discharge and recharge rate, you wouldn't need as big of an alternator, or as many AH. And as a side note, you shouldn't mix battery chemistries. Capacitors are kind of obsolete now a days with the introduction of lithium banks, but to even get a cap bank worth a crap you'd have to get somewhere in the area of a 5000 f super cap bank. (I don't know much about those. @Fish Chriswould be the dude to talk to about that). But that's why an in dash volt meter is so important, so you can monitor your voltage and address any issues before it starts damaging equipment. Even a cheap one is better than nothing. 

Yeah, I don't know why I thought you meant 7v on your car battery🤣 sorry, I wasn't thinking

Whats a good lithium i remember looking for some and they were always like 40amphr and were like 500 dollars or some shit and could i just connect it straight to the capacitor not sure if id need an isolator 

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1 hour ago, Sumtingwong said:

Whats a good lithium i remember looking for some and they were always like 40amphr and were like 500 dollars or some shit and could i just connect it straight to the capacitor not sure if id need an isolator 

If you go lithium, or if you're going to beef up your electrical anyway, I'd ditch the cap. You don't need it, it'll just be one more connection in the way that can cause problems. I don't think you'd have any difference in voltage with our without it. 

With lithium though, Limitless Lithium, XS, JY Power, CES, are good brands that come to mind. There's Lifepo4 and LTO. You shouldn't mix these 2 kinds of lithium (not that you would, just figured I'd say it). From taking to some people, people are leaning a little more towards the LTO cells, but there's nothing wrong with Lifepo4. CES has an 80ah LTO set for $1000. On a 200 amp alternator, their saying it can easily handle 10k to 15k watts. You don't need all that, I'm just saying. Lithium is pretty bad ass for your big systems. Check this out and read the description. 

 

https://store.soundsolutionsaudio.com/ces-custom-electric-service-40ah-lto-battery-cased-lithium-10-spot-terminals-actively-balanced/

 

It's not cheap, but unfortunately if you want more power, to do it right isn't cheap

Or, there are tons of videos on YouTube on how to build your own bank of cells. It comes out to be cheaper that way

 

https://ficaraudio.com/product/yinlongcells-single/

Edited by Dafaseles

2011 Chevy Silverado under construction

My build log here. Check it out! 

 

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