Jump to content

Recommended Posts

okay so if you only want to paint the dash you:

clean the dash

then wetsand the dash with a 80 grit and move up to a 150 grit.(make sure you dont sand too much into the vinyl).

then clean again

then fillerprimer it

then wetsand with a 220 grit, then wetsand with a 400 grit. (in your previous post you didnt spcify wether to wetsand after the primer, so i want to make sure about this step).

clean again.

and then paint

Is the step-by-step process correct?

would you need to spray on adhesive promoter before the primer also?

you would WETSAND right?

the reason i am seeking reassurance (i guess thats the way to say it), is because nismo painted his dash and he basically had 2 steps, clean the dash off with soap and water. and the second step is paint the dash with "Duplicolor Vinyl and fabric" paint.

He neither wetsanded, nor added adhesive promoter or primer.

Baylor University

Accounting

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 61
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Also, with the normal process of painting plastic parts, you say to spray adhesive promoter and then filler primer, as many coats necessary to fill in the grain. You than say to wetsand with a 220 grit and then wetsand with a 400 grit. Then you paint.

My question is, when you are done sanding, are you expecting to have sanded all the primer off, or will there still be primer left on the plastic piece?

Also, are you suppose to wetsand the primer lightly?

I always thought you were suppose to add primer and then paint, with no sanding in between the primer and painting. I am assuming you probably could skip the sanding after the primer, but it wouldnt give the best results possible...

Baylor University

Accounting

Link to comment
Share on other sites

okay so if you only want to paint the dash you:

1- clean the dash

2- then wetsand the dash with a 80 grit and move up to a 150 grit.(make sure you dont sand too much into the vinyl).

3- then clean again

4- then fille rprimer it

5- then wetsand with a 220 grit, then wetsand with a 400 grit. (in your previous post you didnt spcify wether to wetsand after the primer, so i want to make sure about this step).

6- clean again.

7- and then paint

Is the step-by-step process correct?

would you need to spray on adhesive promoter before the primer also?

you would WETSAND right?

I numbered the questions to make it easier for to know what I am answering.

1 - yes

2 - you do not nessacarily have to wet sand. But doing so with a soapy water (dawn dishwashing detergent) will clean the dash as you sand of oils

3 - yes

4 - yes.....but ADHEISION PROMOTOR first

5 - you do not nessacarily have to wet sand. Use a guide coat and sand till the coat is gone....no more

6 - yes

7 - yes

normal_EPICENTERDESIGNS_128.gif

Building The Best.....Repairing The Rest

The bitter after-taste of a poor quality job will last far longer

than the sweetness of that cheap price!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, with the normal process of painting plastic parts, you say to spray adhesive promoter and then filler primer, as many coats necessary to fill in the grain. You than say to wetsand with a 220 grit and then wetsand with a 400 grit. Then you paint.

My question is, when you are done sanding, are you expecting to have sanded all the primer off, or will there still be primer left on the plastic piece?

Also, are you suppose to wetsand the primer lightly?

I always thought you were suppose to add primer and then paint, with no sanding in between the primer and painting. I am assuming you probably could skip the sanding after the primer, but it wouldnt give the best results possible...

This will sorta go back to #6 above.

You sand as much of the grain out as you can, so the filler primer is only as thick as it needs to be.

When you sand the primer, you don't have to sand the primer off. Thats is why I suggest a guide coat. With the guide coat, sand till the guide coat is gone and then no more. Use a block when possible at all times.

Now we are talking filler primer here that will be built up, thats why you sand it smooth. Filler primers could have runs that sand off really easy so saying 220 might be high. 100 -150 - 180 might be needed at first to knock it down some. Follow me?

normal_EPICENTERDESIGNS_128.gif

Building The Best.....Repairing The Rest

The bitter after-taste of a poor quality job will last far longer

than the sweetness of that cheap price!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

okay awesome, so i am just trying to smooth out the primer, not take the primer off. And my last question concerning this topic, you do not add any primer after you finish sanding the "already applied" primer smooth.

Baylor University

Accounting

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here ill say what i think and you can tell me if i am correct or not. You can add another coat/coats of primer after you sand the previous coat of primer smooth, it doesnt matter. Its not necessary to repeat this process again but you can.

-Nismo in his center console thread primered and then wetsanded with a 220 grit, then a 400 grit. He then applied more primer and wetsanded again, this time only with a 400 grit.

However, you can always apply more primer if you are wetsanding with the 220 grit and you see yourself going too far into the plastic. Then you should spray more primer on and again wetsand with a 220 grit, then wet sand with a final 400 grit.

Baylor University

Accounting

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the only concern i have here is ur wetsanding part. u said use 80 grit...which isnt bad. at least ur wet sanding. but im in autobody and work with the stuff everyday. and 80 gritt is a bit corse to be using if u ask me. u want my oppinion use 120 at first then go to 220 and 320 if needed. much smoother finish and thats how i did mine. we use 80 grit to knock the high spots off body filler so that seems a bit corse. but its ur decission thats just my 2 cents worth if u want it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What you have to understand it that I am spraying filler primer....to FILL.

If it runs, thats when I use the 80grit to knock it down and thats it.

I'll find a pic in a sec.

Once you sane the guide coat off, there is no need to add more primer unless you sanded into the piece too much. Light colors will need primer, dark colors will cover it. Make sense?

Also to complicate things, it depends on your primer and base coat.

Slick Sand can be based right over unless the base coat paint calls for a sealer to be put down first.

In this pic, House of kolors paint was used over Slick Sand. But since the color is light, it used a white sealer primer fiorst to make the proper color......

Posted Image

Posted Image

This dash was done in the exact steps I have been describing.

normal_EPICENTERDESIGNS_128.gif

Building The Best.....Repairing The Rest

The bitter after-taste of a poor quality job will last far longer

than the sweetness of that cheap price!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now I also use Feather Fill. Still made by Evercoat but it requires a sealer before base is put down. It is more pourous. So I don't even wet sand it. I dry sand it.

But it lays down smoother than Slick Sand but takes more to cover the same area.

It is just a price thing. Slick Sand = $70 gallon and Feahter Fill = $60 gallon. But when you use as much as I do, that $10 adds up.

normal_EPICENTERDESIGNS_128.gif

Building The Best.....Repairing The Rest

The bitter after-taste of a poor quality job will last far longer

than the sweetness of that cheap price!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is a wiper cowl I made for a Toyota.

I sprayed it with the filler primer and it ran some. No big deal, it sands like chalk.

I did a guide coat on it and did a couple passes with 220 and this is what was left showing the low spots........

Posted Image

Spme more sanding and it was smooth as glass and ready to paint........

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

normal_EPICENTERDESIGNS_128.gif

Building The Best.....Repairing The Rest

The bitter after-taste of a poor quality job will last far longer

than the sweetness of that cheap price!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Who's Online   1 Member, 1 Anonymous, 88 Guests (See full list)




×
×
  • Create New...