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BassMunky

2 0f 3 fuses blown.. help

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On 1/24/2020 at 5:36 PM, deathcards said:

all i did was add a time stamp? but on a serious note you could have a defective coil which slowly died versus say something as catastrophic as the wrench melting in seconds. tinsel lead could have come in contact with something it shouldn't.

As for your fuse question it is wired in parallel (correct if i am wrong here folks) so your fuses blew in order of weakest to strongest in an attempt to protect your amp and by the 3 fuse it was making a racket as you could tell. I would check ground first remember to disconnect the rca's before you disconnect the ground, i would check the resistance of your speakers, then inspect your wires, and finally try a different input source.

 

 

edit spelling

Will try been busy


Shakin not Stirred....my buildhttp://www.stevemead...ngle-cab-build/412 CVX

And put a sealed enclosure in your trunk cut a hole in your deck and call it ported :lol2:

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14 hours ago, strangeduck said:

You keep bumping this thread, have you tried anything anyone has suggested?

Soon man, just trying to get more suggestions. Or everyone past scenarios how to fix mines...


Shakin not Stirred....my buildhttp://www.stevemead...ngle-cab-build/412 CVX

And put a sealed enclosure in your trunk cut a hole in your deck and call it ported :lol2:

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10 hours ago, BassMunky said:

Soon man, just trying to get more suggestions. Or everyone past scenarios how to fix mines...

So that's a no?

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11 hours ago, strangeduck said:

So that's a no?

Yeah haven't had time cause my 4 channel amp is under the sub box. Also I just got it out today and this sat I will meter all the wire for the amp.


Shakin not Stirred....my buildhttp://www.stevemead...ngle-cab-build/412 CVX

And put a sealed enclosure in your trunk cut a hole in your deck and call it ported :lol2:

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On 1/23/2020 at 9:14 PM, BassMunky said:

bumpp soo a loose ground could have cause it? why would the amp still work if only 1 fuse was still inserted an the other 2 was taken out?

Because the fuses are all internally connected as 1 fuse block inside the amp, there maybe 3 fuses but the amp sees it as 1 90 amp fuse instead of 3 30 amp fuses.. Similar to how some amps have two 1/0 gauge power and ground outputs, or some monoblocks have 2 positive and 2 negative speaker wire outputs even though they are internally connected as 1.


So if 1 fuse is still good the amp will continue to play, though it is taking on the work load of the other 2 blown fuses plus its own.

 

All fuses are not created equal, just because they are rated at a specific amperage doesn't mean they will blow at said amperage. In this case a 30 amp fuse might blow once current surpasses 30 amps for a period of time or it might blow once it surpasses 40 amps of current for a  specific time. So that 1 fuse that was still good maybe a much stronger 30 amp fuse than the other 2 for one reason or another, could be a different brand, or a different production run made at a different time even..

7 hours ago, BassMunky said:

Hope it fixed finger crossed. Dont wanna jinx hum and noise gone. What I did was ground the rca to back of deck. 

If grounded out the outter shield of the RCAs fixed your engine whine that leads me to believe you hot swapped your rca cables at one point or another. 

Hot swapping your rca cables is when you unplug and plug them in when the radio/amp(s) are turned on. Which is fine to do as long as you don't touch the center pin of the RCA cable on anything grounded such as the vehicle body, battery ground, or even the outter rca terminal when you goto plug the rca back in (which can happen very easily without you even noticing).
This is very similar to blowing the pico fuse on Pioneer radios, but it can happen to other brand radios as well when you hot swap the rca cables and short out the positive RCA cable signal.
 

So if I was a betting man I would say you unplugged your RCA cables with the stereo on, grounded out your RCA cable one way or another which not only fried a trace inside your radio but also caused you to short out your amp and blow fuses.

Its really the only logical thing since both issues appeared to happen at the same time.
Of coarse Im sure you didn't do that, no one never does that and things just blow on their own!

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12 hours ago, audiofanaticz said:

Because the fuses are all internally connected as 1 fuse block inside the amp, there maybe 3 fuses but the amp sees it as 1 90 amp fuse instead of 3 30 amp fuses.. Similar to how some amps have two 1/0 gauge power and ground outputs, or some monoblocks have 2 positive and 2 negative speaker wire outputs even though they are internally connected as 1.


So if 1 fuse is still good the amp will continue to play, though it is taking on the work load of the other 2 blown fuses plus its own.

 

All fuses are not created equal, just because they are rated at a specific amperage doesn't mean they will blow at said amperage. In this case a 30 amp fuse might blow once current surpasses 30 amps for a period of time or it might blow once it surpasses 40 amps of current for a  specific time. So that 1 fuse that was still good maybe a much stronger 30 amp fuse than the other 2 for one reason or another, could be a different brand, or a different production run made at a different time even..

If grounded out the outter shield of the RCAs fixed your engine whine that leads me to believe you hot swapped your rca cables at one point or another. 

Hot swapping your rca cables is when you unplug and plug them in when the radio/amp(s) are turned on. Which is fine to do as long as you don't touch the center pin of the RCA cable on anything grounded such as the vehicle body, battery ground, or even the outter rca terminal when you goto plug the rca back in (which can happen very easily without you even noticing).
This is very similar to blowing the pico fuse on Pioneer radios, but it can happen to other brand radios as well when you hot swap the rca cables and short out the positive RCA cable signal.
 

So if I was a betting man I would say you unplugged your RCA cables with the stereo on, grounded out your RCA cable one way or another which not only fried a trace inside your radio but also caused you to short out your amp and blow fuses.

Its really the only logical thing since both issues appeared to happen at the same time.
Of coarse Im sure you didn't do that, no one never does that and things just blow on their own!

the thing is that the fuse went while i was driving home one dy after work about ten minutes.  im not disagreeing with anyone just trying to get a better knowledge of what really happened.  I haven't touched the rca for a while that why.


Shakin not Stirred....my buildhttp://www.stevemead...ngle-cab-build/412 CVX

And put a sealed enclosure in your trunk cut a hole in your deck and call it ported :lol2:

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