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TheGriffster7

2-ohm Low Gain or 4-ohm Hi Gain

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I have a Rockford Fosgate Prime 500.1 and I’m  looking to buy two Rockford P3S 8” shallow subs, they are dual voice coil subs that have a power rating of 150rms. My question is what should my final impedance be? 

Rockford Prime 500.1 specs:

300rms at 4ohm

500rms at 2ohm 

Should I run a 2ohm load and turn the gain down or should I do a 4ohm load and turn the gain up? 

Note: I’m installing this in my girlfriends daily driver, an 04 Double Cab Tacoma. I currently installed Rockford Fosgate 2-ways in all four doors and a Sony XAV-AX100 head unit. 

Edited by TheGriffster7

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How are you setting your gains? Do you know what volume  your HU clips at? 


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For starters, did you get 2 ohm or 4 ohm dual voice coil subs? Depending on what you have will determine whether you are able to wire it to either 2 or 4 ohm. And it will be your final resistance, not impedance. Impedance is going to be the reactive load the amp sees after power is applied to the drivers.

Also, the load you present to your amp does not determine "high or low" gain setting. The gain isn't a volume knob. The gain is set to match the input AC voltage from your head unit rca outputs. The proper way to do this is with test equipment that can measure distortion, by first finding the distortion point of your HU, then using that level to find the same on your amp. 

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For this setup, amplifier seeing a 2 ohm load should be fine.

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I still haven’t bought the subs, I’m trying to find out which “ohm” version to buy. I’m trying my best to understand all of the terminology but it’s difficult. I know for sure the subs I want are the ones I listed in my original post (Rockford P3S 8” 150rms). 

I don’t have any kind of distortion detector, I just never turn anything past 3/4 (HU and Amp Gain), sometimes I won’t turn past 2/3 depending on how things sound. I know that’s not getting the most out of my system but it’s worked for me and the couple systems I’ve installed. 

So I’m trying to figure out if I should: 

1) Buy two 150rms 2ohm DVC subs and run my amp at 2ohm (500rms) and set the gain lower than I normal would, which from my understanding would result in less chance of distortion. 

2) Buy two 150rms 4ohm DVC subs and run my amp at 4ohm (300rms) and set my gains how I usually do (2/3 or 3/4) depending on how it sounds. This sounds like the better option to me but does it have a higher chance of clipping or distortion? 

I don’t have the money to invest in a distortion detector. I could probably go down to a audio shop and have them help set my gain but before I can even do that I need the subs...

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Get dual 2 ohm drivers. Series each up to 4 ohms then parallel down to 2 ohms. It’s always best to series parallel. Easy. 

You don’t need a distortion detector to tune moderate. 

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Awesome, thank you! 

I almost went the other route and bought the dual 4 ohm. I’m glad I posted on here. 

What are the benefits of running the 2 ohm load if you don’t mind explaining? Does the amp run cooler? 

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You can run either way, that’s just the way I’ve always done it. The subs tend to be a little more dynamic to me. 

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