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chrisw.

Running my amp at lower impedance than it's meant for?

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Ok so I'm no noob and I know its every rookies mistake to try and push their equipment just past what its recomended. But... I recently had my amp clamp tested by a friend and we dropped it down to 2ohm mono for kicks (only 4Ohm stable) and it belted out just a hair under 1kw! Not bad for an amp that's only rated at 300w rms x 1 lol. I should mention the amp is an old school MTX Thunder amp notoriously known to being underrated and built like tanks.

So channeling the teenager within I've proceded to start running the ampgetting at 2Ohms mono for the last month and it's been awesome! I told myself this is stupid and if it starts to run hotter than normal or goes into thermal protection I'm going to knock it off and go back to running it @ 4ohms. But the thing is it hasn't. It just performs like its meant to be run like that.

-Is this giving me a faulse sense of security?

-If it were under strain would I know it? Would it be obvious?

-Are there amps out there that run lower than recomended all day with no problem?

-If I do fry it by doing this, will it be repairable?

Thanks

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I'll be honest with you, I didn't even read your post.

Bottom line is that dropping an amp below it's recommended lowest impedance will generate more heat than it's designed to take and basically self destruct eventually. Self destruct like the last seen in Predator .

So don't do it! The gains in wattage if any aren't worth it.

Remember Predator, ya like that

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I hope you keep a fire extinguisher handy ... It's not a matter of if, but a matter of when ...

Just because you see a 55 mph speed limit sign doesn't mean you can drive 75 mph whenever you fell like it ...

... one day when you least expect it ... you will get that speeding ticket ...

Always better to be safe that sorry ...

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To answer you questions, if it gets hot thats a sign. If it were to break it would cost more than its worth to fix it.

Its more about are you willing to replace it if it breaks? If its a quality amp, and you can keep the voltage up, then your minimalizing the risk..

If its a good amp, itll go into protect maybe. Then you know. If not then itll shit itself possibly catching on fire.

Your call.

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Old school amplifiers do not have the "Up to Date" protection circuits like the amplifiers of today ... plainly put, they are not idiot proof ...

Nobody ever said that the amplifiers would not play below rated ... but that they are not made for it and recommends against it ...

Edited by Cablguy184
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LMAO Do they actually catch on fire? I thought that was a joke

Well @ 4ohms the amp will run hot and go into protection if I clap it out for too long so I know the protection circuit is doing its job that's why I am more or less judging it by that.

Since it's been at 2ohms I'm carefully with the volume and it hasn't shut itself down even once

As far as replacing it. Yeah I think it time to upgrade to an amp with more power and this amp cost me $40 used so it's not a huge loss other than it being a really nice amp compared to today's amps.

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Old school amplifiers do not have the "Up to Date" protection circuits like the amplifiers of today ...

^very good

Also your amp is not made with parts that can support a low ohm load, part failure is coming.

Maybe not today but it's coming.

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LMAO Do they actually catch on fire? I thought that was a joke

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