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21 hours ago, jmanjr82 said:

I may be confused. I meant upgrade to 1/0 for the Batts and if your already running 1/0 then might as well carry that over to the amp and use reducers to get the wire into the amp. You stated 2 grounds correct? What 2 grounds? Do you have matching power wires for those grounds? 

 

 

Check my build

 

 

1/0  from alt to front to back battery. Ground each battery close by with less then 12 in of 1/0 cable. Splits to 1/0 to 2 4ga for the sub anp 1500rf and mids and high amp 100.4 sundown. Both have 4g ground less then 12 in. If that helps

Shakin not Stirred....my buildhttp://www.stevemead...ngle-cab-build/412 CVX

And put a sealed enclosure in your trunk cut a hole in your deck and call it ported :lol2:

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Then its tinned, and it shouldn't really have any corrasion issues unless you have lugs installed and not terminated properly. 

A piece of 4 awg wire that is a foot long can easily handle 300amps of current without failing.
So it would probably be wise to go over every connection in your wiring.

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4 hours ago, audiofanaticz said:

Then its tinned, and it shouldn't really have any corrasion issues unless you have lugs installed and not terminated properly. 

A piece of 4 awg wire that is a foot long can easily handle 300amps of current without failing.
So it would probably be wise to go over every connection in your wiring.

What would have caused the ground wire for the amp to be really hot? Any variables?

Shakin not Stirred....my buildhttp://www.stevemead...ngle-cab-build/412 CVX

And put a sealed enclosure in your trunk cut a hole in your deck and call it ported :lol2:

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Do you have any idea how old your wire is?

Heat is caused by 1 of 3 things typically.
 

1- Corrosion, and there's a few different ways this can happen such as the moist salty air, or because 2 different types of metals that are connected to each other are attacking each other. While corrosion won't kill the power flow fully it will definitely hinder the ability to transfer power from point A to point B due to the increased resistance in the connection which can cause heat.
I had a friend who ran out of 1/0 so he bought a 4 feet of name brand CCA from the local shop just to get his Sundown SCV-4000 playing, a week later the amp blew and the terminals were all melted. The wire was in there tight and secure and it took a lot of force to pull it out. After inspecting the wire and cutting the casing off the entire piece it was so badly corroded, it was basically aluminum power inside the wire jacket. Went to the shop to check a couple more feet off the spool which was also full of corrosion too!

 

2- Bad/loose connections, either your set screws in an amplifier or on a fuse holder are too loose or don't have a proper grip on the wire causing a poor contact which will cause excessive amounts of power flow through a smaller piece of wire causing heat. Or you could have a poor quality crimp or solder job on one lug terminal causing the same resistance or even a bad ground on the vehicle that may have rusted which again will cause heat. Anytime you one of those cheap fuse blocks that are all melted it's almost always because someone didn't tighten the wire into or bolt the fuse down tight.
You need to check every connection point, every ring terminal, every battery connection, every body/chassis ground, pull on every ring terminal to make sure a wire doesn't pop out, positive wires, negative wires, everything! Don't just look at the connections, grab them with your hands twist it pull it wiggle each and every last one of them!!

 

3- Wire gauge being inadequate (too small). This reason is pretty straight forward, but seeing that you're using quality wire and the amplifier specs call for the gauge wire you're using, and you said the wire is rather short then non of these should be the issue causing heat.

Like I said before with such a short piece of 4awg wire you can pass several hundreds of amps of current through it without stressing the wire, same goes for any wire for that matter.
If you take a piece of 1/0 awg that is rated at 300 amps of current that rating is given with a length typically around 17-20 feet. So if you take a 10 foot piece of the same 1/0 awg wire you can safely send 600 amps through it because the distance is shorter.
There becomes a point of time where adding more runs of wire, or even using those dual power inputs for your amp(s) start to serve no real purpose in many applications because of the dimension returns. This is becoming even more so now with how tech has been growing around super caps and lithium batteries and the power that can be discharged so quickly, but you will still have people that will go overkill on these things and use dual inputs just so they can get a 0.05volt gain. 

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10 hours ago, audiofanaticz said:

Do you have any idea how old your wire is?

Heat is caused by 1 of 3 things typically.
 

1- Corrosion, and there's a few different ways this can happen such as the moist salty air, or because 2 different types of metals that are connected to each other are attacking each other. While corrosion won't kill the power flow fully it will definitely hinder the ability to transfer power from point A to point B due to the increased resistance in the connection which can cause heat.
I had a friend who ran out of 1/0 so he bought a 4 feet of name brand CCA from the local shop just to get his Sundown SCV-4000 playing, a week later the amp blew and the terminals were all melted. The wire was in there tight and secure and it took a lot of force to pull it out. After inspecting the wire and cutting the casing off the entire piece it was so badly corroded, it was basically aluminum power inside the wire jacket. Went to the shop to check a couple more feet off the spool which was also full of corrosion too!

 

2- Bad/loose connections, either your set screws in an amplifier or on a fuse holder are too loose or don't have a proper grip on the wire causing a poor contact which will cause excessive amounts of power flow through a smaller piece of wire causing heat. Or you could have a poor quality crimp or solder job on one lug terminal causing the same resistance or even a bad ground on the vehicle that may have rusted which again will cause heat. Anytime you one of those cheap fuse blocks that are all melted it's almost always because someone didn't tighten the wire into or bolt the fuse down tight.
You need to check every connection point, every ring terminal, every battery connection, every body/chassis ground, pull on every ring terminal to make sure a wire doesn't pop out, positive wires, negative wires, everything! Don't just look at the connections, grab them with your hands twist it pull it wiggle each and every last one of them!!

 

3- Wire gauge being inadequate (too small). This reason is pretty straight forward, but seeing that you're using quality wire and the amplifier specs call for the gauge wire you're using, and you said the wire is rather short then non of these should be the issue causing heat.

Like I said before with such a short piece of 4awg wire you can pass several hundreds of amps of current through it without stressing the wire, same goes for any wire for that matter.
If you take a piece of 1/0 awg that is rated at 300 amps of current that rating is given with a length typically around 17-20 feet. So if you take a 10 foot piece of the same 1/0 awg wire you can safely send 600 amps through it because the distance is shorter.
There becomes a point of time where adding more runs of wire, or even using those dual power inputs for your amp(s) start to serve no real purpose in many applications because of the dimension returns. This is becoming even more so now with how tech has been growing around super caps and lithium batteries and the power that can be discharged so quickly, but you will still have people that will go overkill on these things and use dual inputs just so they can get a 0.05volt gain. 

Thanks man ill look and start trying

Shakin not Stirred....my buildhttp://www.stevemead...ngle-cab-build/412 CVX

And put a sealed enclosure in your trunk cut a hole in your deck and call it ported :lol2:

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The T1500 inputs are super close together for power and ground...I tried 1/0 to 4 AWG reducers and they touch each other.  No bueno.  Also, the length of the 4AWG portion of the reducers was too short to reach all the way into the opening (the power and ground inputs are recessed) This would require custom made reducers.

On 10/13/2022 at 3:04 PM, jmanjr82 said:

I may be confused. I meant upgrade to 1/0 for the Batts and if your already running 1/0 then might as well carry that over to the amp and use reducers to get the wire into the amp. You stated 2 grounds correct? What 2 grounds? Do you have matching power wires for those grounds? 

 

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7 hours ago, bigmizzle99 said:

The T1500 inputs are super close together for power and ground...I tried 1/0 to 4 AWG reducers and they touch each other.  No bueno.  Also, the length of the 4AWG portion of the reducers was too short to reach all the way into the opening (the power and ground inputs are recessed) This would require custom made reducers.

 

Suggestions on a comparable amp?

Shakin not Stirred....my buildhttp://www.stevemead...ngle-cab-build/412 CVX

And put a sealed enclosure in your trunk cut a hole in your deck and call it ported :lol2:

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