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Kyblack76

Port area. what does it affect?

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In a perfect environment I don't think that you could have too much, you'll only use what is needed anyway, but not having enough the speakers will try and force enough to come in and out.

Air has to be moving, you put your hand next to it you feel it...

Air can compress which is known as acoustic compression when having too little.

However when you have a defined displacement with a defined velocity you must have the correct area to be able to move the volume being moved by the displacement.

you can have to much....

imho, dont see anyone running 1000 sq" of port for a 12.

and honestly.. maybe i should have asked "how much is not enough.... , not how much can i have"..

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I'm with you, I'm not worried about output, definitely not numbers. I build for my happiness, and that happiness would go away if the sub is damaged because it got too hot for too long or went past mechanical limits or something even on rated power.

my worry...

i know im short... and well, my subs have done fine for 4 years... but......

id like more info for the new.

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Because that would be idiotic just based off of the fact of space saving.

You would have to have a stupid long port to make up for it.


b_350_20_692108_381007_FFFFFF_000000.png

Krakin's Home Dipole Project

http://www.stevemeadedesigns.com/board/topic/186153-krakins-dipole-project-new-reciever-in-rockford-science/#entry2772370

Krakin, are you some sort of mad scientist?

I would have replied earlier, but I was measuring the output of my amp with a yardstick . . .

What you hear is not the air pressure variation in itself

but what has drawn your attention

in the two streams of superimposed air pressure variations at your eardrums

An acoustic event has dimensions of Time, Tone, Loudness and Space

Everyone learns to render the 3-dimensional localization of sound based on the individual shape of their ears,

thus no formula can achieve a definite effect for every listener.

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Because that would be idiotic just based off of the fact of space saving.

You would have to have a stupid long port to make up for it.

right...

stupid.

you can have to much...

that said.. if short, .. what happens?

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I'd think way too much port area would be similar to running the subs ib.

How much is too much I couldn't say because I honestly have no clue but there has to be a point where it's hurting and not helping.

Just my thoughts and I'm not very knowledgeable when it comes to this stuff so I could be way wrong.


That being said a lot of people's definition of "music" is a clipped 30 hz sine wave with some 80 IQ knuckle head grunting about committing crimes and his genitals.

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Port compression. Same as acoustic compression.

Please tell me how having over minimum area hurts the output of a speaker.. I don't care at all about location restraints.


b_350_20_692108_381007_FFFFFF_000000.png

Krakin's Home Dipole Project

http://www.stevemeadedesigns.com/board/topic/186153-krakins-dipole-project-new-reciever-in-rockford-science/#entry2772370

Krakin, are you some sort of mad scientist?

I would have replied earlier, but I was measuring the output of my amp with a yardstick . . .

What you hear is not the air pressure variation in itself

but what has drawn your attention

in the two streams of superimposed air pressure variations at your eardrums

An acoustic event has dimensions of Time, Tone, Loudness and Space

Everyone learns to render the 3-dimensional localization of sound based on the individual shape of their ears,

thus no formula can achieve a definite effect for every listener.

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Port compression. Same as acoustic compression.

Please tell me how having over minimum area hurts the output of a speaker.. I don't care at all about location restraints.

what is min ??

EDIT- im just asking bro.. hell if i know..

im just getting in to enclosures.. and not sketch up...

anyway..

what if im short? what happens?

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An isobaric sub has no port to connect the chamber to the outside so port area in no was would cause that.


b_350_20_692108_381007_FFFFFF_000000.png

Krakin's Home Dipole Project

http://www.stevemeadedesigns.com/board/topic/186153-krakins-dipole-project-new-reciever-in-rockford-science/#entry2772370

Krakin, are you some sort of mad scientist?

I would have replied earlier, but I was measuring the output of my amp with a yardstick . . .

What you hear is not the air pressure variation in itself

but what has drawn your attention

in the two streams of superimposed air pressure variations at your eardrums

An acoustic event has dimensions of Time, Tone, Loudness and Space

Everyone learns to render the 3-dimensional localization of sound based on the individual shape of their ears,

thus no formula can achieve a definite effect for every listener.

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