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roscoe1129

Multiple Amps Or Accesories On Remote Lead

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Connecting Additional Devices to the Remote Turn On Wire

Using a 30 amp SPDT relay, connect terminal #87 to constant 12 volts positive with a fuse rated to the sum of the additional accessories you've added and the components you need to turn on. (If you have two fans rated at 5 amps each and a neon light rated at 10 amps, you would use a 20 amp fuse plus 200 ma for each amplifier and processor.) Connect terminal #85 to ground, terminal #86 to the remote turn on wire from the head unit, and terminal #30 to each accessory with an appropriate fuse. A fuse (not shown) could also be used between the output of the relay (#30) and the remote turn on wire of the amplifiers and/or processors for extra precaution.

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Interesting, usually the high current input is the 30 with output being 87 when the control circuit 85 & 86 are energized. Output 87a would be the path for current when the control circuit 85 & 86 is not energized.

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i wouldnt think it would matter if your just using it for acc. but people should get used to 30 being the input and the 87 and 87a for the outputs.

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Before using a relay, realize that:

1. Most power amps and processors require between 10 and 20 mA of current to power the turn-on circuit

2. A "bosch" type relay requires between 110 and 120 mA of current to power the coil

3. Most source units are capable of between 250 ma and 500 ma or current on their turn-on leads (this will be specified in the owners' manual)

Finally, connecting a relay as shown to the turn-on output of a source unit could actually damage it. I would strongly recommend installing a diode across the coil of the relay (in reverse bias - stripe side to turn on lead and non-stripe side to ground). When power to the coil of a relay is turned OFF, the electromagnetic field within the coil collapses. This can in some cases result in a very large voltage spike traveling up the turn-on output of the source unit, which could damage it. The diode will shunt this spike to ground, thereby making the addition of the relay harmless.

Edited by snafu
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Damn snafu when I think I have all the basics cemented in my pea sized brain, you throw me through a loop. LOL

Edited by ISO

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Before using a relay, realize that:

1. Most power amps and processors require between 10 and 20 mA of current to power the turn-on circuit

2. A "bosch" type relay requires between 110 and 120 mA of current to power the coil

3. Most source units are capable of between 250 ma and 500 ma or current on their turn-on leads (this will be specified in the owners' manual)

Finally, connecting a relay as shown to the turn-on output of a source unit could actually damage it. I would strongly recommend installing a diode across the coil of the relay (in reverse bias - stripe side to turn on lead and non-stripe side to ground). When power to the coil of a relay is turned OFF, the electromagnetic field within the coil collapses. This can in some cases result in a very large voltage spike traveling up the turn-on output of the source unit, which could damage it. The diode will shunt this spike to ground, thereby making the addition of the relay harmless.

meaning if all your really powering is multiple amps and processors a relay isnt necessary

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Before using a relay, realize that:

1. Most power amps and processors require between 10 and 20 mA of current to power the turn-on circuit

2. A "bosch" type relay requires between 110 and 120 mA of current to power the coil

3. Most source units are capable of between 250 ma and 500 ma or current on their turn-on leads (this will be specified in the owners' manual)

Finally, connecting a relay as shown to the turn-on output of a source unit could actually damage it. I would strongly recommend installing a diode across the coil of the relay (in reverse bias - stripe side to turn on lead and non-stripe side to ground). When power to the coil of a relay is turned OFF, the electromagnetic field within the coil collapses. This can in some cases result in a very large voltage spike traveling up the turn-on output of the source unit, which could damage it. The diode will shunt this spike to ground, thereby making the addition of the relay harmless.

Could this relay then cause a slight click that comes through my speakers on start up?, i presently have a relay connected.

I have had both Boston amps bench tested and given the thumbs up, but all tests still point to the amps being the cause of this noise. extremely frustrated :unknw:

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Sorry to ask this weird wack question but what does the relay look like? I don't think i have seen it before or maybe i did.

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Before using a relay, realize that:

1. Most power amps and processors require between 10 and 20 mA of current to power the turn-on circuit

2. A "bosch" type relay requires between 110 and 120 mA of current to power the coil

3. Most source units are capable of between 250 ma and 500 ma or current on their turn-on leads (this will be specified in the owners' manual)

Finally, connecting a relay as shown to the turn-on output of a source unit could actually damage it. I would strongly recommend installing a diode across the coil of the relay (in reverse bias - stripe side to turn on lead and non-stripe side to ground). When power to the coil of a relay is turned OFF, the electromagnetic field within the coil collapses. This can in some cases result in a very large voltage spike traveling up the turn-on output of the source unit, which could damage it. The diode will shunt this spike to ground, thereby making the addition of the relay harmless.

agreed on the diode ive burnt up a few transistors by not having one in place

Sorry to ask this weird wack question but what does the relay look like? I don't think i have seen it before or maybe i did.

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