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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/24/21 in Posts

  1. I always wanted to strap 2 amps together and test them. Since i am dropping these two into my Ford F250 soon, i figured today was a good day to do that! For info on this amp visit http://www.b2audio.com More specs on this amp (pdf file) here https://www.b2audio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/rage_amps_man_090119.pdf Thanks for watching if you did!
    4 points
  2. welp everyone i hate to say it but ive been trying for a month or so now to recover my password but i cant get into old email account so i guess ill start from scratch had 11 years on that account if i remember correctly but oh well i'm here and ready to rubble how has everyone been
    4 points
  3. I love it! I think it is missing something though. So i added this clear acrylic trim piece just to see if i would like it there. I think i will probably keep it and make it out of aluminum or stainless. I think it breaks it up nicely.
    4 points
  4. the wife asked me to make her a giant wall clock with Roman numerals. I guess i could have just bought one but it was more fun to make. Made of 3/16” black acrylic (laser cut) and a few hours of design time. It works great and she loves it!
    4 points
  5. Speaker pods are done. Got more wiring too. Got an 80prs now as my head unit. Got 394.2 cubic feet of sky high 80 mil, doubling up. Orange acrylic LTO case from LoudAF. I’ll post pictures during my actual build in about a week or so. Waiting a few things things in the mail.
    4 points
  6. True, TRUE sq, can get out of hand fast, budget wise. Speaker location, is huge, as well as direct over buying 4000 dollar focal rigs. Ive never done a sq build, but, buying seperates, over comp sets seems ideal to me (what ive done) as well as processing, time alignment, location, direction, sound dampening, vehicle resonance at specific frequencies, and such, then, that brings in tools. You will want/need a good mic, laptop/3software, and such, to show you bandwidth, peaks, valleys, direction, TA, and such. (Where a good dsp will help) Source can be huge, lossless files/music is a full other bag of monsters.... A true sq oriented building is super satisfying and SUPER involved. Most say SQ, and most just have decent gear in oem locations, and it sounds ok, and they call it sq. Gear,.. bring money. Most SQ guys, won't run anythkng but class A, or class AB. They are large amps, that make more heat than your generic class d turd. (See Tonys big boy, sq class holy fuck amplifer line, things cost more than my entire build) So, its all up to you, how far you wanna go down the rabbit hole. Cheers and good luck. (I think most that say SQ, TRUE SQ, really dont have any idea what they are getting into, but, if you're willing, anything is doable no doubt)
    3 points
  7. Since its an SIA amp, you most likely (or your "friend that knows more") have the crossover settings on the amp all wrong for sub use, it's a common issue with people that know it all but never messed with a full bridge full range amp before. It's so bad of an issue of this self proclaimed professional installers that been doing this forever send perfectly working amps back as bad amps for warranty. Watch this video which explains what the crossovers do and how to set them, since its a full range amp the crossovers basically work oppisite/backkwards of what they do on a typical sub amp that just outputs a low pass only signal.
    3 points
  8. Ive had 8 amps, on one remote line. Never had a issue.
    3 points
  9. Here are the Skar EVL (Yellow) and the Resilient Gold (orange) on your box specs. The Resilient Gold it looks they can work in a larger net volume than the skar, in fact their spec tops at 2.5 net per driver, they even have larger Xmax to back it up. Conclusion: these subs will work just fine in your current box but you may gain some extra performance going with a larger box.
    3 points
  10. It almost looks like a grey scaled filter or something...but it isn't. This photo is real life. green ain't exactly my favorite color but it does look good here! that's all for today! new video coming tomorrow!
    3 points
  11. Crazy design built crazy fast but I do agree with you, if you enjoyed the outcome, in the end it's all that matters.
    3 points
  12. Thats 100% not the glue that they use on dustcaps. Also the way the surround is unevenly pulled away from the basket edges is rather jank So this was apparently rebuilt by someone with very little experience in building woofers. This is not Sundown quality and something like this wouldnt be sold as new. Your audio dealer is trying to play you for a fool, so I would throw this threw his shop window and put a gun to his head and tell him to give back your money.
    3 points
  13. a little bit of kitty hair, some sanding and it is starting to become one! i rattle canned them black so i can see how they will look NOT wood. Then i sanded some more. As of right now they are still ugly but starting to take shape, If you squint and ignore my sand paper marks you might be able to envision my vision. These will be wrapped in black suede to match the upper piece in the door panel. Hopefully tomorrow.
    3 points
  14. Haven’t posted here in a while. Thought I’d check in and say wussup. And contribute. One of My little projects
    3 points
  15. The lazyness of this animal Oh yeah hi I adopted a dog
    3 points
  16. Usually, cone area is king. So 2 subs on the same power as a single sub is usually going to be louder. Not crazy amounts louder, but usually you can hear a difference. You also have to take into account your space. A single 12" in the perfect enclosure can get louder than 2 15's in an enclosure that's not right. So you can't just go jamming in subwoofers to a space that's not adequate. To get the maximum out of the space you have available, figure out how much your willing to give up, then decide how many subs and what size.
    3 points
  17. Here's a cool project of making a car audio boombox coffin. I used old school car audio equipment including Rockford Fosgate source units and a Power 300 amplifier from 1988. Check it out!
    3 points
  18. No one answer. There's a lot of interplay depending on what you want to do. It's like buying a car, and asking what the most important feature is. Short answers: - Power handling appropriate for your needs - QTS for ported / sealed applications. Lower QTS is more appropriate for a ported box, higher for sealed. But don't get too hung up on this because there's a litany of exceptions and install dependent variables. Just know it exists. - xmax has an interplay here, but is not the sole decider. Subwoofer drivers need to displace a sizable quantity of air. All other factors equal, you can displace more air wit a driver that has a higher xmax. Again, don't get too hung up about it. - Higher impedance results in higher damping factor from the amp. i.e. the amplifiers ability to mechanically brake the inertia of a cone when the signal stops Anecdotally... And I have no data to back this up outside of some small-sample-size personal observations.... But for daily builds: I like drivers that have a very high BL^2/RE (motor force) for a given amount of cone area, with the lowest impedance coils I could possibly find (I simp for 0.35 coils), with stiff suspension, in a medium to larger box tuned fairly low with a medium to low amount of port area. Not the loudest enclosure, but they've always given me a rather ridiculous response range(think from 15-17hz up to 50-60+) with no muddiness / odd resonances, or issues with transient response / group delay artifacts. TL;DR: Don't sweat individual specs. Just buy a driver from a reputable company that'll handle the power you need to throw at it, then make a box to suit your needs. Pay mind if the manufacturer indicates the driver is intended for sealed or ported use.
    3 points
  19. - Honestly, you don't need a kit. You just need wires, ring terminals, fuse. Fuse should be placed on any positive wires coming off the battery, as close to the battery as is practical. - How do you know you're not clipping? - You might have better luck with 2 subs in a single box, as opposed to 2 smaller boxes - Be mindful of your voltage drops
    3 points
  20. Figured I would throw this in the Junk Drawer. It likely won't interest too many people here, but I'm going to try and put together a build log for the new shop. Tomorrow I'll shoot some video of the "old" shop. I've almost got everything there packed up. So yesterday I "washed" the floor using a garden hose and a shop broom to get all the dirt, grime and dust (or at least as much as I reasonably could) off the floor/out of the new shop. Spent about 4 or 5 hours doing that and the inside of the shop git 99 degrees (and of course humid as hell with all the water). Today I got in the shop around 10ish in the morning and spent the entire day applying a spray on sealer with a little bit of concrete stain to darken it just a bit. I used a product called V-Seal. It's pretty easy to work with and has almost no odor at all: I went with the 101 and Phase II. In hind sight I could have easily gotten away with a single 5 gallon jug of each. That said I ended up doing 2 applications of the 101 and a single application of the Phase II. Here is the before with the (mostly) clean floors and some paper masking the painted drywall: And a short video walkthrough before I got to work: Before.mp4 Here are a couple of shots applying it in sections. You spray it on and then work it with a paint roller: Here is applying the Phase II: And finally finished with both applications of the 101 with the stain and the Phase II: And a short video of the after: After.mp4 I may go ahead and do the stairs tomorrow, not sure, but I will definitely get a short video of the old shop. Here is a shot of what I have planned for the build-out / layout: If I added the stairs I would have to shift the spray booth to the right by the width of the stairs as well as move the inventory rack that is next to the Nomad / Assembly Station. I think I will also move the entry door to the Laser room to in-between the band saw and the drill press and shift the laser to the other end of the room. I'll figure out the stair situation tonight / in the morning LoL. It would be nice to have random/misc junk storage above the office/bathroom/spray booth, but I might just use a ladder to get up and down. Let me know if the shop build is something that interests anyone and I'll keep taking pictures and videos of the progress and continue the build log!
    3 points
  21. I've read that the kicker premade boxes are tuned really high. Like 45 hz or something. I've talked to a couple box designers and they all say the premade boxes for the square subs are way too small and tuned way too high. It'll work, and you'll probably like it, but having a box designed for the sub and the power you're giving the sub and the vehicle is going in its always best
    3 points
  22. That amplifier, in the right enclosure, will sound good on either sub. Remember, as far as sound goes, the enclosure makes all the difference in the world
    3 points
  23. The PR7000 was Jim Fosgate's first car audio amplifier, introduced at the Summer 1973 CES in Chicago, Illinois. This unit was ahead of it's time with RCA inputs, bass and treble boosts and more. Originally priced at $300 USD ($1850 in 2021), this amplifier was truly ahead of it's time. The built-in equalization circuitry would carry forward for decades inside future Fosgate and later Rockford Fosgate amplifiers. Thank you, Jim for your contributions to car audio!
    3 points
  24. Well, alpine has a reputation for being an SQ brand and Digital Design is known for being more of a brand that has great output, but still maintains a level of SQ. People might refer to them as an SQL brand. That being said, I don't think you'd be disappointed in either sub to be honest. You already know you love the sound from a type R, but if you wanted to try something new, DD is a great, strong brand as well with a great reputation. As far as which is louder and which can play lower, that mostly depends on the enclosure you build, or have built. In an install, the enclosure is probably 80% as far as importance of the install. Really only 20% equipment. And just saying, double check and make sure your electrical can handle that 2000 watts. If it can't handle it, it's going to perform like crap no matter what you do.
    3 points
  25. of course i can’t have no wires hanging. I know i am capable of running wires in walls…but i have an amazing electrician and its just easier to have him do it. Plus its another person that gets to make some extra money and i like giving people the opportunity to make some side cash .
    3 points
  26. You need more electrical and you need to set your gains and crossovers correctly. What does your electrical consist of now? Have you done the big 3 with 1/0 OFC? That's a big one. 1500 watts isn't super crazy. Depending on what you have, you might be able to just get away with just doing the big 3 upgrade. Also, your gain is there to basically match the output voltage of your head unit. So saying that your gain is flat makes no sense. There are tons of videos on YouTube that will talk you through setting your gains with a multimeter if you don't have access to a DD1 or an oscilloscope. Your LPF should be set around 80 hz. Your subsonic filter should be set around half an octave below the tuning of your enclosure. So if the port on your enclosure is tuned to 30 hz., half of 30 it's 15 (that's a whole octave) half of 15 is 7.5 so let's just call it 8. 8+15=23. So in this case, your subsonic filter should be set at 23 hz. Which amplifier are you running? The RP, SKv2, or the marine 1500 watt Skar amp?
    3 points
  27. He is talking about would a big 3 and his stock alt support a Skar rp1500d. Im guessing it isn’t an sk1500d because of a few hints I assessed. I could be wrong. But either way, current draw is similar. So to answer that question, yes, that is fine, but a second battery (agm, preferably 80ah-120ah) is needed to stabilize voltage to get longevity out of his car audio gear, but stock on a big 3 would survive but would have to be monitored on long and hot plays or anything that causes voltage dipping would not only over work that amp and heat it up but then the subwoofer(s) would clip. So to survive on that setup, the user would have to be cautious and smart.
    3 points
  28. Not a lot done between storms and personal life issues. I went with some advice of using instead of screws for the trim panels. So I did and really liked how well they worked. All that is left is trying to fix a few mistakes. Install the batts and braces. Then when the cab section is done I will be able to start powering it up.
    3 points
  29. I'm not sure I'm happy yet with this. Was wanting to do something else, made some concessions and "forgot" some things that will require rework. It is up and running sans subwoofers right now. There was a surprising amount of bass without the subs, so thats a bonus. This is temporary as the Cleansweep is meant to be under the panels, but forgot to cut holes for wiring. Tried using my SHCA cables....they are horrible. switched back to these Blue Jeans custom cables...and shrill top end and hiss disappeared.
    3 points
  30. Update on on the front stage So there was a break in all the rain we've been getting (it's supposed to storm again tomorrow) and pulled the door card off the drivers side along with the A-Pillar cover to showcase the tweeter mount. I also figured out that I can get unlimited storage for high-res pics and videos by subbing to the forum, so that's done So you can see that I had (by this point in the build) ran out of the NVX I'd had on the shelf for so long and used some Second Skin. I'm guessing I didn't have a lot of that on hand as I applied it sparingly. The AW65s are direct lead and you can see the red and black wires coming out. They are spliced into 12 gauge KnuKonceptz. The AW3s aren't direct lead and have 14 gauge running all the way to the driver. Sparse deadening on the inside of the door as well, adding more deadener to both doors along with foam rings and something to suppress any standing wave issues are now on the todo list I think machining some new adapters out of a stiffer substrate (like 3/8 acrylic maybe) is on the todo list as well. These adapters are ok, but not as stiff as I would like Stock tweeter location Tweet mount. I used CA glue to fix the tweet to the bracket and you can see how the vapors from the curing glue leaves a discolored effect on the back of the tweeter housing (probably won't do that again) And of course my cat taking advantage a chance to try and stow away. He really likes going for rides in the truck (or any vehicle) So nothing special on the doors. I need to pull them both and do some more work on them. That's how less than ideal my memory is, I would have sworn I had added more deadener when the front stage went in, but the photos don't lie!
    3 points
  31. Double 1/0 run, fusing, double 1/0 chassis ground and sound deadening So now that the big Mechman alternator is in and the amp rack is ready to be wired up, it was time to run power and apply sound deadener in the cabin. I had a couple cases of NVX sound deadening sheets laying around so I used that. I had to take some some pics of the 1/0 runs today (almost 2 years after the install) as I couldn't find the pics I took then. Aside from being dirty, they are holding up well and I do check them a couple times a year for any degradation of the jacket. Here are some shots of the ABS fuse plate I mounted to the battery holder. I used a heat gun to form this the same way I did with the amp rack top mount. I had the InstallGear fuse holders on a shelf and wish I had ordered an SMD fuse block for this. I had to add zip ties to the holder mount as the top of the holders will just fall off otherwise, plus the look, feel and are cheap. They get the job done, but given everything that ended up going into the build, I should have gone with an upgrade here: Here are some shots of the under-chassis run of the double 1/0 (again, dirty as I took these pics this morning, but they haven't lost any integrity that I can tell: Here is a shot of the location I used to run the power in and the chassis grounds out, it's the passenger side near the door jam at the back as the metal forms up to create the shelf where the seats would normally mount (and where the amp rack get's mounted): Here's a shot of the double chassis ground. It is on the inside of the frame rail on the passenger side of the truck: Here are some shots of deadener day. I spent most of a Sunday pulling out the interior, cleaning everything and laying in deadener. I have to say, this XL has the least road noise of any F150 I've ridden in: Just try not to think about the dirt and grime (or rather where it came from) while cleaning it up. I think I found a couple bucks worth of change while doing this as well: Rolling in the deadener and running signal and remote turn on: At this stage, I wish I had run power and ground for the head unit up from the distribution from the amp rack. That is definitely on the todo list that will come at the end of the build log. Up next will be the woofer enclosure build!
    3 points
  32. Mechman Elite 320A + XS Power D6500 XS + Big 6 (Double runs of 1/0 tinned OFC) To quote Steve Meade "Everybody says it takes power to make power". I think this is where a lot of enthusiasts new to the hobby are missing out. I have seen so many setups where where people put the cart ahead of the horse and install a 4k amp into a small sedan with a stock electrical system and then don't understand why the amp runs hot, isn't making power, headlights dim, etc., etc., (we've all been there) That in mind, I tried to build the system around the power I could make. I don't remember the exact specs on this alternator (and I don't feel like digging through boxes to find the spec sheet) but I do remember that it's rated at 320+amps once it's warmed up (not just cold output) and it makes full output at a fairly low RPM (think cruse control set running down the highway). I knew I wanted to install a double run of 1/0 back from the engine bay. 1 run for the mids and highs + accessories and one dedicated to the DM2500.1a sub amp so I did a Big 6. While busting my knuckles doing this, I installed the XS Power D6500. At the time I remember thinking this was the best balance of energy storage and cost. And just like anybody that has replaced/upgraded the alternator on one of these trucks knows - This is a complete PITA. You have to remove a lot of the cowling tubing etc. to get to it and the nose of these trucks are high up off the ground and a complete b**ch to work on/around. I thought I had more pictures of this, but I also remember it being a hot/muggy Texas summer afternoon/evening and just wanting to get the damned thing back together again Next up, amp rack build!
    3 points
  33. T and S parameters for x12 v3 after a few months of abuse regular use.
    2 points
  34. i really admired the desk my good bro Bobby Gately made for his office. So i made a mention about how id like to have one. As busy as he is, like CRAZY busy, he was totally up for it. So i told him what i wanted such as a pop out for my steering wheel and gave him some dimensions. This beast needed to be OVER 10’ wide to take up my entire wall. Late in the build i asked for a sliding tray for my keyboard. I had some nice long rail sliders here at the shop just sitting around. So i dropped those off along with more dimensions (for the tray). Came back later to pick it up. He had it in about 5 pieces pre assembled and disassembled for transport. We took it up the hill and pit it together. My dimensions were a little wide so he ended up stopping his day again and fixing it. Anyhow, this office is just taking shape so if you see boxes, cords etc i am still under construction. But check this bad boy out
    2 points
  35. Ideally you want a a single sub to handle 2000-2500 rms or 2 subs to handle 2000-2500 rms in total (if you want to be safe) . I have run the Smart 3 on a few set ups and it was running about 2200-2500 rms at 2.5/2.7 ohms after impedance rise.
    2 points
  36. 2 points
  37. It can be, depending on who's building it. But if you have even a little bit of skill with wood (you don't need a lot) you can build your own. First you have to find someone to design you a good box. If they don't ask you what amplifier you're using to power the sub, that's not a good design. How much power you feed the subwoofer is important. Try to find someone who can also give you a cut sheet. The cut sheet will have all the different cuts to make on the 4'×8' sheet of wood (3/4" MDF or Baltic Birch seem to be the most used). Take that cut sheet to a lumberyard or someplace that will cut the wood for you. Get the pieces cut you need, take them home, glue it and screw it! Done and done! You have yourself a great sounding custom box. There are also tons upon tons of videos on YouTube that you can watch that will explain step by step in how to get it done.
    2 points
  38. Also, I noticed last night while I was working on some stuff, that my original plan of using a half inch piece of MDF cut into a ring with the speaker grill wrapped around it wasn't going to work. I mounted one of the 8's, and looked a little closer, and it wasn't even close to being able to go over the top of the 8. So I had to glue 2 pieces together in order to make it workalso, my plan was to only have the rings be a half inch all the way around. The new idea is, since I'm not going to router a channel around it for the ring to sit inside, I'm just going to cut out holes where the speakers will sit, leaving the most amount of wood I can. It shouldn't add a lot of weight to it, but it will make things a lot stronger.
    2 points
  39. Also my box plans came in today as well. 8.5 cubes tuned to 30hz. RIP to my trunk space
    2 points
  40. Squeeze another .5 cubic foot net to equal 12 cubic foot net and do 8” aero ports (3) from big ass ports. Don’t worry about going against recommended specs, it’s not out of the norm to do this and companies use recommended specs as a guideline and they know and we know things vary on each application. The max length per port they sell is 22”. So on 3 of them ports, that would be 35hz tuning on 12 cubic foot net and about 12.285 square inches of port per cubic foot. Which is nice on an aero port build. Now let me figure the displacements of ports and subwoofer and I’m gonna add 0.7 cubic foot displacement for bracing. Subwoofers are about .23 cubic foot per subwoofer. And each port has a displacement of about 0.705 cubic foot. So to yield 12 cubic foot net volume, you have to add these figures to that net volume so you know the gross volume of the actual enclosure you are trying to get as close as possible to when typing in measurements. 15.275 cubic foot gross volume is what’s needed.
    2 points
  41. Man, the build log looks awesome, can't wait to see as it all starts going in. I am especially keen to hear how the DB 4ks at .35 Ω come together, that is CRAZY low. Is the truck still a 12v setup after the battery delete or is it 14/16v with a regulator for non-audio equipment?
    2 points
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